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A new home for Pegasus

After more than 13 years in the atrium at the Southbank office, Pegasus has a new home at Altona Refinery.

The statue, which is almost five metres high and weighs a massive three tonne in total, was shifted to the refinery following the Southbank office move to Docklands. 

The statue was originally constructed in 1960 by sculptor Raymond Ewers, who was famous for his work commemorating war, including the Father and Son statue at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance.

Facilities Advisor Rebecca Gao said while shifting Pegasus posed some logistical challenges, the detailed planning involved between the Southbank and Altona teams meant the move was completed safely and without a hitch.

“In its most recent history, Pegasus has moved from the old Mobil headquarters at 2 City Road to the 417 St Kilda Road building in 1993, then to Southbank in 2005. 

“Each of these moves, including this one to Altona Refinery, has been conducted by artwork removalists J K Fasham and their trusty crane, so we knew we were in good hands,” she said. 

Photo — Workers safely install the statue, which was sculpted in 1960 and is almost five metres high and weighs a massive three tonne in total.

Did you know?

Pegasus was first adopted as the company’s symbol of speed and power as long ago as 1911. Mobil Sekiyu in Japan was the first to colour it red. It became a trademark in the US shortly after the organisation of Socony-Vacuum in 1931.

Photo — The Pegasus statue takes pride of place at Altona Refinery.

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