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11 Dec. 2018

Carolyn is a STEM superstar!

ExxonMobil Australia Offshore Risk, Environment and Regulatory Supervisor Carolyn Thomas has been named an official ‘Superstar of STEM’ by Science & Technology Australia (STA).

The Superstars of STEM program aims to smash society’s gender assumptions about scientists and increase the public visibility of women in STEM. STA created Superstars of STEM to create a critical mass of celebrity Australian female scientists and technologists - role models for young women and girls – and to work towards equal representation in the media of women and men working in all fields in STEM.

Carolyn, who works in the Safety, Security, Health and Environment (SSHE) team at ExxonMobil Australia’s Docklands office, was one of 60 new ‘Superstars’ announced today. She said she was thrilled to have the opportunity to participate in the program.

“I want girls to see that they can be an engineer, a leader, a mother, and a daughter and a friend all at the same time, and that the engineering world could be their world too. 

Carolyn’s passion for championing change for women in STEM began in university, when, as a member of staff of the National Youth Science Forum, she mentored and inspired Year 11 students from around Australia to pursue degrees in Science and Engineering. 

“Since then, I have spoken at secondary schools about my career as an engineer, the opportunities I have had and the satisfaction of being able to work as part of an amazing team to solve problems and deliver essential energy to society. I regularly volunteer at my children’s primary school to run science activities and talk to the students about the cool stuff that scientists and engineers do all day.

“At ExxonMobil Australia, I am a member of the Women in Energy Network (WEN) committee, running events that seek to connect women with networks, help them learn new skills and inspire them to greatness,” she said.

Professor Emma Johnston AO, President of Science & Technology Australia, said the women would no longer be hiding their scientific superpowers, and would share them with as many Australians as possible following the launch.

“When we launched the program last year, I said that the stereotypical scientists was an old man in a white coat. Thanks to the first 30 Superstars this is starting to change, and with 60 more announced today, we will be well on our way to permanently smashing the stereotype.

“We are extremely proud to have seen hundreds of capable, skilled, confident women apply for the program, and really look forward to sharing the stories of these impressive 60 Superstars with the world,” Professor Johnston said.

 
Carolyn Superstars of STEM
Photo — “I want girls to see that they can be an engineer, a leader, a mother, and a daughter and a friend all at the same time, and that the engineering world could be their world too."

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